Jane Caro - Author Q & A

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VISIT US

Hours

Monday: 9am-8pm
Tuesday: 9am-8pm
Wednesday: 9am-8pm
Thursday: 9am-8pm
Friday: 9am-8pm
Saturday: 10am-4pm
Sunday: 10am-4pm
Closed on public holidays

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Contact

Phone
02 9391 7100

Email
library@woollahra.nsw.gov.au

Address

Woollahra Library
Level 1, 451 New South Head Road
Double Bay NSW 2028

Hours

Monday: 9:30am-6pm
Tuesday: 9:30am-6pm
Wednesday: 12pm-8pm
Thursday: 9:30am-6pm
Friday: 9:30am-6pm
Saturday: 10am-4pm
Sunday: 10am-4pm* 
Closed on public holidays

*Please note Paddington Library will be opening on Sundays on a trial basis commencing 20 January 2019 and finishing at the end of December 2019.

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Contact

Phone
02 9391 7988

Email
library@woollahra.nsw.gov.au

Address

Paddington Library
Paddington Town Hall
247 Oxford Street,
Paddington NSW 2021

Hours

Monday: 2pm-5pm
Tuesday: 9:30am-5pm
Wednesday: 12pm-7pm
Thursday: 9:30am-5pm
Friday: 2pm-5pm
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
Closed on public holidays

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Contact

Phone
02 9391 7999

Email
library@woollahra.nsw.gov.au

Address

Watsons Bay Library
The Tea Gardens
8 Marine Parade
Watsons Bay NSW 2030

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5 minutes with Jane Caro

Jane CaroJane Caro is an author, novelist, broadcaster, columnist, advertising writer and social commentator. She was awarded the 2018 Walkley for Women’s Leadership.

What was the last good book you read?

The Silence of Girls by Pat Barker. Barker is one of my favourite writers, particularly The Regeneration Trilogy set in WW1. Her latest novel is set among the slaughter and slavery of the Trojan Wars seen from the perspective of the Trojan women who have been captured and enslaved by the victorious Achilles. It is terrifying, moving and completely absorbing.

Do you have a favourite Library?

My local library is Stanton Library in North Sydney. Its where I took my daughters when they were young and where I plan to take my grandson and daughter as soon as they are old enough to enjoy storytime there. It's a lovely, light and bright library which stages fantastic community events, some of which I have been lucky enough to be a part of.

What’s the strangest thing you’ve ever read about yourself or your work?

I get misquoted and misrepresented regularly by a group of notorious right-wing male columnists for right wing news outlets. Happened two days ago, in fact, when I was quoted as saying the opposite of what I actually said. I have given up either reading or reacting to such rubbish. I am routinely surprised by the way some readers react to what I write (or what they think I have written) which makes the times a reader, critic or reviewer completely gets what you are trying to do so very refreshing.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Don’t read the comments.

What inspired you to write your book?

The plight of far too many of the woman of my generation who have changed the world for the better for so many of us, but not – as it has turned out – for themselves. I wanted to honour their contribution and draw attention to their plight.

Want to read more about Accidental Feminists?

Accidental Feminists book coverWomen over fifty-five are of the generation that changed everything. We didn't expect to. Or intend to. We weren't brought up much differently from the women who came before us, and we rarely identified as feminists, although almost all of us do now.

Accidental Feminists is our story. It explores how the world we lived in-with the pill and a regular pay cheque-transformed us and how, almost in spite of ourselves, we revolutionised the world. It is a celebration of grit, adaptability, energy and persistence. It is also a plea for future generations to keep agitating for a better, fairer world.

Accidental Feminists is published by Melbourne University Press and available now